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Rare coin bears good tidings for UNOs Israeli excavations
Archaeology Daily ^ | Saturday, July 3, 2010 | Omaha World Herald

Posted on 07/05/2010 1:00:12 PM PDT by SunkenCiv

Dr. Rami Arav... is director of excavation and research at the University of Nebraska at Omaha's Bethsaida Excavations Project, a 24-year effort to uncover the archaeological mysteries of the biblical-era city. The coin, which weighs 7 grams, is 97.6 percent gold, Arav said. The find was unexpected because Bethsaida primarily was home to humble fishermen, he said. Arav said somebody must have been doing good business a little more than 100 years after the birth of Christ. The gold coin, about three-quarters of an inch in diameter, carries the image of Antoninus Pius, the 15th Roman emperor, who reigned between A.D. 138 and 161... The Bethsaida coin is the first Antoninus Pius gold coin excavated in Israel, Arav said, and as far as he knows, it's the first discovery of this particular kind of coin. Archaeologists have unearthed other coins announcing the news of Antoninus Pius's appointment, but none bears the same picture on the reverse side, where the goddess Pietas stands before an altar, he said. Arav said West Virginia University student Alexis Whitley discovered the coin... "This type of a coin was never sold in the market because it is so rare," he said. "It may go for as much as people will be able to pay for it." For now, the coin - along with the rest of the Bethsaida finds, considered to be the heritage of the State of Israel - will go to the Israel Antiquities Authority. Its ultimate destination probably will be the Israel Museum in Jerusalem, Arav said. "Bethsaida has already enriched the Israel Museum with a few other outstanding and rare finds."

(Excerpt) Read more at archaeologydaily.com ...


TOPICS: History; Science; Travel
KEYWORDS: archaeology; coin; coins; epigraphyandlanguage; godsgravesglyphs; israel
Rare coin bears good tidings for UNOs Israeli excavations

1 posted on 07/05/2010 1:00:17 PM PDT by SunkenCiv
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To: StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; 1ofmanyfree; 21twelve; 240B; 24Karet; 2ndDivisionVet; ...

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2 posted on 07/05/2010 1:02:03 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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To: SunkenCiv

The site comes up but the print is missing.


3 posted on 07/05/2010 1:16:23 PM PDT by chapin2500
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To: chapin2500

It worked for me.


4 posted on 07/05/2010 1:23:29 PM PDT by BARLF
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To: chapin2500
I'm using a ten year old OS and orphan browser, and I see it fine. Give me a minute.
Antoninus Pius

5 posted on 07/05/2010 1:23:35 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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To: SunkenCiv

http://www.archaeologydaily.com/news/201007034498/Rare-coin-bears-good-tidings-for-UNOs-Israeli-excavations.html


6 posted on 07/05/2010 1:27:02 PM PDT by BARLF
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To: SunkenCiv

I can see the article you posted to me. The close-up of the coin is what I wanted. Thanks! For some reason the original link would only load half way.


7 posted on 07/05/2010 1:29:52 PM PDT by chapin2500
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To: chapin2500

I’m using Firefox and when I tried to zoom in the print disappeared. It was there at the default view setting. At my default 1920 x 1080 setting I can barely read it.


8 posted on 07/05/2010 1:31:57 PM PDT by Stentor
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To: chapin2500

That’s good, because the second pic (the one just up there) is a closer closeup.


9 posted on 07/05/2010 1:35:36 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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To: SunkenCiv

Why would it be so unexpected? An entire village wouldn’t have a coin between them?


10 posted on 07/05/2010 1:38:20 PM PDT by GeronL (Just say NO to conservativecave.com, it rots your teeth!)
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To: chapin2500

That coin doesn’t look very worn at all, does it?


11 posted on 07/05/2010 1:39:21 PM PDT by GeronL (Just say NO to conservativecave.com, it rots your teeth!)
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looks like Lincoln,sure it isn’t a penny????


12 posted on 07/05/2010 1:40:28 PM PDT by razbinn (I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America,and to the republic for which it ...)
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To: Stentor
All the links and the page itself is there. However, where the print should be is blank. I'll try later, have to go and pick up the missus.

Cool coin though!

13 posted on 07/05/2010 1:40:54 PM PDT by chapin2500
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To: GeronL
That coin doesn’t look very worn at all, does it?

Suspiciously well preserved but then Roman Aurei (Aurius's?) didn't tend to circulate much. Compare the ware of a Kennedy half dollar to a quarter of the same year.

Here's an image of a similar coin that's about 50 years older.

The reverse inscription, which translates to something like "agreement of the army" relates to the fact that old Nerva came to power after his esteemed predecessor, the Emperor Domician was whacked in the tepidarium of the imperial palace by a guy his old lady and some senators hired.

The army liked Domician and Nerva obviously thought it was a good idea to let everybody know there were no hard feelings and the army was in fact very happy.

Being emperor was a tough job in those days.

14 posted on 07/05/2010 2:06:21 PM PDT by InABunkerUnderSF (Anyone who has read Roman history knows a barbarian invasion when they see one.)
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To: GeronL

Most of the time, coin of the realm wasn’t used for transactions, all was barter. And gold coin was scarce. After the Roman Empire passed its financial peak (reign of Trajan who had a nice big payday due to his conquest of Dacia; Trajan ruled a couple reigns before Antoninus Pius) the Empire’s population continued to grow, and more and more demand for coinage took place.

The response was bronze coinage, which had taken over nearly entirely before the traditional fall of Rome. The Roman bronze coins tend to be in very bad shape if they’ve been in the ground (and typically, that’s where they are found), but currency is merely a medium of exchange — a fact identified by the Romans.

There was a revival of gold coin minting during the peak of the Byzantine phase of the empire, because Constantinople got fabulously rich from trade and taxation. Gold Byzantine coins at least used to be pretty reasonably priced, mainly because gold survives well, and they were minted in pretty large quantities.

There’s a misconception that there’s enough gold around to mint into usable coin; the entire pile of gold ever mined in history wouldn’t make a cube 1000 inches on a side. 1000 cubed is one billion (cubic inches), and the population of the Earth today is between six and seven billion people.


15 posted on 07/05/2010 2:07:07 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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whoops.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aurelian#Felicissimus.27_rebellion_and_coinage_reform

[snip] Aurelian’s reign records the only uprising of mint workers. The rationalis Felicissimus, mintmaster at Rome, revolted against Aurelian. The revolt seems to have been caused by the fact that the mint workers, and Felicissimus first, were accustomed to stealing the silver used for the coins and producing coins of inferior quality. Aurelian wanted to erase this practice, and put Felicissimus under trial. The rationalis incited the mintworkers to revolt: the rebellion spread in the streets, even if it seems that Felicissimus was killed immediately, possibly executed. The Palmyrene rebellion in Egypt had probably reduced the grain supply to Rome, thus disaffecting the population with respect to the emperor. This rebellion also had the support of some senators, probably those who had supported the election of Quintillus, and thus had something to fear from Aurelian. Aurelian ordered the urban cohorts, reinforced by some regular troops of the imperial army, to attack the rebelling mob: the resulting battle, fought on the Caelian hill, marked the end of the revolt, even if at a high price (some sources give the figure, probably exaggerated, of 7,000 casualties). Many of the rebels were executed; also some of the rebelling senators were put to death. The mint of Rome was closed temporarily, and the institution of several other mints caused the main mint of the empire to lose its hegemony.[12]

His monetary reformation included in the introduction of antoninianii containing 5% silver. They bore the mark XXI (or its Greek numerals form KA), which meant that twenty of such coins would contain the same silver quantity of an old silver denarius.[13] Considering that this was an improvement over the previous situation gives an idea of the severity of the economic situation Aurelian faced. The emperor struggled to introduce the new “good” coin by recalling all the old “bad” coins prior to their introduction.


16 posted on 07/05/2010 4:57:30 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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To: SunkenCiv

That coin is in beautiful condition.


17 posted on 07/07/2010 1:23:25 PM PDT by colorado tanker
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To: colorado tanker

Clearly the Koranimals didn’t invent the metal detector.


18 posted on 07/07/2010 3:53:40 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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To: SunkenCiv

Thanks for that great background info.

Gold artefacts, to me, have a special glamour. They are so pure and bright - untouched by time.


19 posted on 03/01/2014 1:30:30 AM PST by BlackVeil
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