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Hatshepsut mummy found
Egyptian State News Service ^ | Friday, March 24, 2006 | unattributed

Posted on 03/26/2006 8:43:05 PM PST by SunkenCiv

The true mummy of ancient Egyptian queen Hatshepsut was discovered in the third floor of the Egyptian Museum in Cairo, Secretary General of Supreme Council for Antiquities Zahi Hawwas revealed on Thursday.

The mummy was missing among thousands of artifacts lying in the museum, he said during his lecture at the New York-based Metropolitan Museum of Arts.

He said for decades archaeologists believed that a mummy found in Luxor was that of the Egyptian queen. It was a streak of luck, he said, to find this mummy.

The Metropolitan is hosting a Hatshepsut exhibition that displays 270 artifacts on the life history of the queen.

The American museum honoured Hawwas and his accompanying delegation in appreciation of their effort to unravel the mysteries of the Egyptian Pharaohnic age.

(Excerpt) Read more at sis.gov.eg ...


TOPICS: History; Science; Travel
KEYWORDS: 18thdynasty; ancientautopsies; ancientegypt; egypt; godsgravesglyphs; hatshepsut; helixmakemineadouble; museum; newkingdom; valleyofthekings

1 posted on 03/26/2006 8:43:07 PM PST by SunkenCiv
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To: blam; FairOpinion; Ernest_at_the_Beach; StayAt HomeMother; 24Karet; 3AngelaD; asp1; ...
WOW! It's hard not to be amused, though, that the collection is so disorganized, no one knew until now. And that assumes of course that it is the real deal, not some goofy PR stunt.

To all -- please ping me to other topics which are appropriate for the GGG list. Thanks.
Please FREEPMAIL me if you want on or off the
"Gods, Graves, Glyphs" PING list or GGG weekly digest
-- Archaeology/Anthropology/Ancient Cultures/Artifacts/Antiquities, etc.
Gods, Graves, Glyphs (alpha order)

2 posted on 03/26/2006 8:44:10 PM PST by SunkenCiv (Yes indeed, Civ updated his profile and links pages again, on Monday, March 6, 2006.)
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Hatshepsut

3 posted on 03/26/2006 8:50:59 PM PST by SunkenCiv (Yes indeed, Civ updated his profile and links pages again, on Monday, March 6, 2006.)
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To: SunkenCiv

What happened to the "new look". ;)


4 posted on 03/26/2006 8:55:25 PM PST by FairOpinion (Dem Foreign Policy: SURRENDER. Real conservatives don't help Dems get elected.)
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Sounds like this is out the window:
American Egyptologist Donald P. Ryan excavated tomb KV 60, in the Valley of the Kings, during the course of 1989. Inside, he found the mummy of a royal female, which he believes to be the long-lost remains of the great Queen Hatshepsut (18th Dynasty). Ryan describes the mummy as follows: "The mummy was mostly unwrapped and on its back. Strands of reddish-blond hair lay on the floor beneath the bald head."
[no attribution given, because the site is icky]

KV60, on the Theban Mapping Project website
KV20, on the Theban Mapping Project website
KV42, on the Theban Mapping Project website
5 posted on 03/26/2006 8:56:45 PM PST by SunkenCiv (Yes indeed, Civ updated his profile and links pages again, on Monday, March 6, 2006.)
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To: FairOpinion

:') It's up there, in the first post. I didn't get any negative feedback regarding the use of the logo, but I'm not going to take any chances with A) over 500 members, and B) with the bandwidth of over 500 members. ;')


6 posted on 03/26/2006 8:58:49 PM PST by SunkenCiv (Yes indeed, Civ updated his profile and links pages again, on Monday, March 6, 2006.)
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To: SunkenCiv

I've visited the museum, and to be perfectly honest I'm not surprised they would misplace something like this. Thanks for the ping!


7 posted on 03/26/2006 8:59:24 PM PST by Serb5150 ("Tesla, you don't understand our American humor." —Thomas Edison)
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To: SunkenCiv

I think at this size it's not too much for bandwith. It's "just about right".


8 posted on 03/26/2006 9:01:06 PM PST by FairOpinion (Dem Foreign Policy: SURRENDER. Real conservatives don't help Dems get elected.)
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To: Serb5150

My pleasure. I'll speculate that many other such finds are waiting there. :')


9 posted on 03/26/2006 9:11:12 PM PST by SunkenCiv (Yes indeed, Civ updated his profile and links pages again, on Monday, March 6, 2006.)
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Ancients Rang In New Year With Dance, Beer
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 12/31/2005 2:28:56 PM EST · 92 replies · 1,007+ views


Discovery | 12-30-2005 | Jennifer Viegas
Ancients Rang In New Year with Dance, Beer By Jennifer Viegas, Discovery News Dec. 30, 2005 -- Many ancient Egyptians marked the first month of the New Year by singing, dancing and drinking red beer until they passed out, according to archaeologists who have unearthed new evidence of a ritual known as the Festival of Drunkenness. During ongoing excavations at a temple precinct in Luxor that is dedicated to the goddess Mut, the archaeologists recently found a sandstone column drum dating to 1470-1460 B.C. with writing that mentions the festival. The discovery suggests how some Egyptians over 3,000 years ago...
 

Burial complex of Mentuhotep II
  Posted by SunkenCiv
On General/Chat 07/27/2004 2:56:40 PM EDT · 4 replies · 235+ views


The History of the Ancient Egyptians | May 2002 | Ian Bolton
Instead of building a 'saff' tomb like those of his predecessors, Mentuhotep II decided to build an impressive tomb by the cliffs of Deir el Bahri (the same location chosen in the 18th dynasty by Hatshepsut). A T-shaped terrace was built using masonary and by using the natural rock. The walls built on this terrace were then decorated both inside and out with painted relief carving.
 

The Great DNA Hunt (Genetic archaeology)
  Posted by restornu
On News/Activism 02/26/2006 12:58:16 AM EST · 21 replies · 608+ views


Archaeological Institute of America | Volume 49 Number 5, September/October 1996 | by Tabitha M. Powledge and Mark Rose
DNA can be used to understand the evolution of modern humans, trace migrations of people, identify individuals, and determine the origins of domestic plants and animals. DNA analysis, as one scholar put it, is "the greatest archaeological excavation of all time." Because ancient DNA molecules are normally so few and fragmented, and preserved soft tissues so rare, scientists had little hope of finding and analyzing it. But two breakthroughs have made this possible: the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), a method for copying any fragment of DNA, and the successful recovery of DNA from preserved hard tissues, bones and teeth, that...
 

Hatshepsut mummy found
  Posted by SunkenCiv
On General/Chat 03/26/2006 11:43:05 PM EST · 7 replies · 35+ views


Egyptian State News Service | Friday, March 24, 2006 | unattributed
The true mummy of ancient Egyptian queen Hatshepsut was discovered in the third floor of the Egyptian Museum in Cairo, Secretary General of Supreme Council for Antiquities Zahi Hawwas revealed on Thursday. The mummy was missing among thousands of artifacts lying in the museum, he said during his lecture at the New York-based Metropolitan Museum of Arts. He said for decades archaeologists believed that a mummy found in Luxor was that of the Egyptian queen. It was a streak of luck, he said, to find this mummy. The Metropolitan is hosting a Hatshepsut exhibition that displays 270 artifacts on the...
 

New Egyptian King Discovered
  Posted by vannrox
On News/Activism 04/26/2002 8:19:20 PM EDT · 21 replies · 421+ views


Discovery News | April 26 2002 | By Rossella Lorenzi, Discovery News
April 26 A new Egyptian king has been discovered, according to Italian archaeologists digging at Luxor. Known to be a high-ranking priest in the theocratic state of Amon at Thebes, Harwa was also a king ruling southern Egypt during the obscure period of the so-called Black Pharaohs, the Nubian kings of the 25th Dynasty. A fat, bald man with a large face, almond-shaped eyes and thin lips, as portrayed in a statue, Harwa was born in the 8th century B.C. into a family of Theban priests. He must have been at the beginning of his career when Piankhy, the black...
 

The Revision of Ancient History - A Perspective
  Posted by vannrox
On News/Activism 04/19/2002 3:33:06 PM EDT · 32 replies · 3,689+ views


SIS - How Historians have now embraced Velikovsky! | Internet Paper Revision no.1 March 2001 | By P John Crowe
Ancient history as taught today is a disaster area. The chronology of the first and second millennium BCE is badly wrong. The history of ancient history revisionism offered here is drawn largely from the pages of SIS publications over the last 25 years. The Revision of Ancient History - A Perspective By P John Crowe. An edited and extended version of a paper presented to the SIS Jubilee Conference, Easthampstead Park, Sept. 17-19th 1999 [1] Internet Paper Revision no.1 March 2001 Contents Introduction An Outline History of Revising Ancient History - Up to 1952. 2.1 Exaggerating Antiquity. 2.2 The Early...
 

Royal Nubia lies under sand
  Posted by vannrox
On General/Chat 04/22/2002 6:38:54 PM EDT · 17 replies · 1,457+ views


National Post | 4-22-02 | Margaret Munro
Royal Nubia lies under sand Canadian archaeologists in Sudan, using magnetometers, have found a 2,000-year-old palace in the heart of the ancient black civilization If his partner had not fallen into an ancient tomb and broken both legs, Professor Krzysztof Grzymski would have discovered the ancient Nubian royal palace even sooner. Still, Grzymski, a professor at the University of Toronto and a curator at the Royal Ontario Museum, is a happy archaeologist these days. He and his colleague, who is walking again, have found what they believe are the remains of a palace and a colonnade built more than...
 

Statue of Egyptian pharaoh found after nearly 3,600 years
  Posted by TigerLikesRooster
On News/Activism 06/05/2005 12:03:10 AM EDT · 54 replies · 1,289+ views


AFP | 06/04/05
Statue of Egyptian pharaoh found after nearly 3,600 years Sat Jun 4, 4:45 PM ET LUXOR, Egypt (AFP) - Buried for nearly 3,600 years, a rare statue of Egypt's King Neferhotep I has been brought to light in the ruins of Thebes by a team of French archaeologists. Officials said on Saturday that the statue was unusual in that the king is depicted holding hands with a double of himself, although the second part of the carving remains under the sand and its form has been determined by the use of imaging equipment. Archeologists unearthed the 1.8 metre (six foot)...
 

10 posted on 03/26/2006 9:16:59 PM PST by SunkenCiv (Yes indeed, Civ updated his profile and links pages again, on Monday, March 6, 2006.)
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To: 75thOVI; AndrewC; Avoiding_Sulla; BenLurkin; Berosus; CGVet58; chilepepper; ckilmer; Eastbound; ...
Speos Artemidos (Grotto of Artemis)
by Jimmy Dunn
About 2 miles southwest of Beni Hassan is the Cave of Artemis, which was hewn out of rock. It is located in the Batn el-Baqara wadi and is dedicated to the lion-goddess Pakhet (she who scratches), otherwise known as Artemis. There are scenes of offerings to various gods, but the most interesting thing here is an inscription over the entrance which states that Hatshepsut (18th Dynasty) has rid Egypt of the Hyksos. Actually, she did not.

11 posted on 03/26/2006 9:20:37 PM PST by SunkenCiv (Yes indeed, Civ updated his profile and links pages again, on Monday, March 6, 2006.)
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To: SunkenCiv
that assumes of course that it is the real deal, not some goofy PR stunt.

And don't underestimate that possibility. Hawass is the consummate publicity-hound.

12 posted on 03/26/2006 9:24:02 PM PST by Bernard Marx (Fools and fanatics are always certain of themselves, but the wise are full of doubts.)
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from KMT I think:
(after William Petty)
Significant Events Yrs from death of Thutmose I Regnal Year of Thutmose II Regnal Year of Hatshepsut Regnal Year of Thutmose III
Thutmose II assumes the throne 1 1
2 2
Mortuary temple inscriptions 3 3
4 4
Thutmose II dies, Thutmose II assumes the throne 5 5 1
Dedication inscription at Semma 6 2
Hatshepsut assumes full titulary
Senenmut's tomb started
7 7 3
Donation stele of Senenmut 8 8 4
Punt expedition, Sinai Stela, Useramen appointed vizier, counting from the accession of Thutmose III ceases 9 9 5
10 10
11 11
12 12
Menkheperre & Hatshepsut depicted together 13 13 13
14 14
Hatshepsut's obelisks begun 15 15 15
First actual joint dating 16 16 16

13 posted on 03/26/2006 9:25:46 PM PST by SunkenCiv (Yes indeed, Civ updated his profile and links pages again, on Monday, March 6, 2006.)
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At Empire's Edge At Empire's Edge
Exploring Rome's Egyptian Frontier

by Robert B. Johnson
[T]he scenic Myos Hormos Road between the Red Sea and the Nile served as a vital artery through the Eastern Desert. Halfway along its path, in Wadi Hammamat, an astounding collection of graffiti and inscriptions attest to its commercial and political importance... These inscriptions, for example, reveal that Queen Hatshepsut's famous expedition to the land of Punt began along this route to the sea.

14 posted on 03/26/2006 9:27:08 PM PST by SunkenCiv (Yes indeed, Civ updated his profile and links pages again, on Monday, March 6, 2006.)
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Not to stray WAY off the subject, but...

GVD Hatshepsut


In 2360, Allied Command commissioned the first of the GVD Hatshepsut-class destroyers. The Vasudan contractor Akheton designed the Hatshepsut to integrate the new beam cannon efficiently within its power grid. The process of retrofitting the older Typhon-class warships yielded only marginal results, with vessels prone to system failures and reactor overloads. Though a handful of modified Typhons remain in service, the Hatshepsut has taken over its role as the primary Vasudan carrier and command ship. With 24 turrets, 5 beam cannons, and 2 fighterbays, destroyers such as GVD Psamtik of Deneb’s 13th Battle Group serve at the vanguard of the modern Vasudan fleet.

Freespace 2
15 posted on 03/26/2006 9:35:40 PM PST by RandallFlagg (Roll your own cigarettes! You'll save $$$ and smoke less!(Magnetic bumper stickers-click my name)
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To: Bernard Marx

Definitely. Of course, that's partly to keep himself in that position, and alive.

The King of Egyptology
Gulf News | 5/9/2005 | Sonali Raha
Posted on 05/12/2005 3:20:51 AM EDT by nickcarraway
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1401515/posts

Archeologists Find Ancient Ship Remains
(cargo carriers between Pharaonic Egypt and Punt)
AP on Yahoo | 1/27/06 | AP
Posted on 01/27/2006 9:14:52 PM EST by NormsRevenge
http://freerepublic.com/focus/chat/1566605/posts

Sailing To Punt
Al-Ahram | 2-17-2006
Posted on 02/17/2006 1:11:15 PM EST by blam
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/1580599/posts


16 posted on 03/26/2006 9:39:05 PM PST by SunkenCiv (Yes indeed, Civ updated his profile and links pages again, on Monday, March 6, 2006.)
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reference to Punt:

Group claims African pygmies slaughtered
upi via bloomberg no url | 7/6/4
Posted on 07/06/2004 9:42:31 AM EDT by NativeNewYorker
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1166134/posts
13 posted on 07/06/2004 6:15:11 PM EDT by monkeyman81
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1166134/posts?page=13#13


17 posted on 03/26/2006 9:41:24 PM PST by SunkenCiv (Yes indeed, Civ updated his profile and links pages again, on Monday, March 6, 2006.)
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Okay, I'm getting dimmer by the minute. Here's the corrected links version, wherein the default (most of the graphic) will open a new window and show the birth of GGG subthread.
And here is a version where the default link will add the GGG keyword to your Links page. Most people seem to not use that feature of FR though, dunno why:
And here is one of my footers, for your convenience:

· Comments · Mail · Home · Forums · Browse · Headlines · Subscriptions · Locale ·
· Profile · GGG · Account · Preferences · Donate · More ... · Log In · Log Off ·


18 posted on 03/26/2006 9:50:07 PM PST by SunkenCiv (Yes indeed, Civ updated his profile and links pages again, on Monday, March 6, 2006.)
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To: RandallFlagg

;') Not much.


19 posted on 03/26/2006 9:50:24 PM PST by SunkenCiv (Yes indeed, Civ updated his profile and links pages again, on Monday, March 6, 2006.)
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To: TR Jeffersonian

ping


20 posted on 03/27/2006 5:30:04 AM PST by kalee
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hatshepsut red chapel search:
Google

21 posted on 03/27/2006 10:13:57 PM PST by SunkenCiv (Yes indeed, Civ updated his profile and links pages again, on Monday, March 6, 2006.)
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To: Do not dub me shapka broham
Now, Hatshepsut: A Glorious Show Breaks Ground
by Lance Esplund
March 23, 2006
The Metropolitan Museum of Art's enormous, glorious show "Hatshepsut: From Queen to Pharaoh" begins in the Great Hall with the Met's own colossal pink granite "Sphinx of Hatshepsut" (c. 1472-58 B.C.E.). One of the great pleasures of this exhibition, other than the fact that the show celebrates, for the first time, one of the greatest and least understood periods of Egyptian art, is that it frees up sculptures that can sometimes feel cramped in the museum's well-endowed yet overcrowded Egyptian galleries.
overcrowded Egyptian galleries -- good problem to have. I think a glimpse of the galleries can be spotted (Temple of Denderah) in the movie "When Harry Met Sally". :')
She's No Tut
by James Gardner
March 28, 2006
Through July 9... it is the response of the present director, Philippe de Montebello, to Thomas Hoving, his predecessor and the man largely responsible for bringing King Tut to our shores. The differences between the two exhibitions are quite clear. The earlier one lingers in the collective memory of the art world as a gaudy crowd-pleaser, intended to hike attendance figures with an abundance of gold jewelry. It also seemed to be utterly typical of Hoving's boisterous, bull-in-the-china shop tenure at the Met... Part of what will draw the crowds is the biographical details of Hatshepsut, a woman who for two decades during the 18th dynasty (ca. 1479-1458 B.C.) was the pharaoh of a united Egypt. In this, she was undeterred by the tradition that only a man could rule the kingdom and she got around that little stipulation by having herself depicted as a man. One senses that the Met is counting on that gender-bending contemporary note to take the place of an abundance of gems.
Nothing like ending the day with a nice juicy politically correct anachronism.
22 posted on 03/28/2006 9:50:17 PM PST by SunkenCiv (Yes indeed, Civ updated his profile and links pages again, on Monday, March 6, 2006.)
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To: SunkenCiv
Professor Tuttle: That wasn't King Ruten-Tuten! That was his wife, Queen Hatsi-Tatsi! This is Ruten-Tuten! He was a midget!
23 posted on 03/28/2006 9:54:43 PM PST by Larry Lucido
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To: Larry Lucido

"Pooloo, see, bagoomba."


24 posted on 03/30/2006 9:43:01 AM PST by SunkenCiv (Yes indeed, Civ updated his profile and links pages again, on Monday, March 6, 2006.)
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To: Berosus

KV 60 (Sit-Ra, called In (?))
http://www.thebanmappingproject.com/sites/browse_tomb_874.html

"An inscription on one coffin bore the name and title, royal nurse, In. In has been thought by some to be Sit-Ra, called In, royal nurse of Hatshepsut. The mummy is now in the Egyptian Museum, Cairo. The other, still unidentified mummy remained in situ. Thomas suggested it might be the mummy of Hatshepsut, relocated by Thutmes III."

[Hawass picked up on this idea of Elizabeth Thomas', who died in 1986, iow, 20 years ago.]

KV 20 (Thutmes I and Hatshepsut)
http://www.thebanmappingproject.com/sites/browse_tomb_834.html

"Perhaps the oldest royal tomb in the Valley of the Kings, KV 20 lies high in the easternmost arm of the Valley, cut into the cliff face near KV 19. The tomb is of very unusual plan: its axis bends from the east toward the south and then toward the west, curving away from the bay of Dayr al Bahri, undermining the theory that the tomb was originally intended to connect with Hatshepsut's memorial temple... The body of Thutmes I was later moved to KV 38, during the reign of Thutmes III. Hatshepsut's burial was left in KV 20, and was eventually sacked by tomb robbers. No remains of her mummy have been identified, although a mummified liver or spleen was found in TT 320 in a box inscribed with her cartouches."


25 posted on 03/30/2006 9:51:50 AM PST by SunkenCiv (Yes indeed, Civ updated his profile and links pages again, on Monday, March 6, 2006.)
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To: SunkenCiv

Okay, so Zahi thinks the mummy in the coffin belonging to the nurse is the real queen. Did they do a blood test or DNA test on the organ in the canopic jar, then?

Also, I noted they said the mummy was on the 3rd floor of the museum. I only remember two floors open to the public when I was there, with the royal mummies in a room at one corner of the second floor, so that sounds like some kind of attic.

Finally, it doesn't surprise me if Hatshepsut didn't have as much gold and jewelry to show off as Tutankhamun did. Nubia had just been conquered, and Syria wasn't part of the "empire" yet, so Egypt wasn't as rich as it would be in a century or two.


26 posted on 03/30/2006 9:55:28 PM PST by Berosus ("There is no beauty like Jerusalem, no wealth like Rome, no depravity like Arabia."--the Talmud)
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To: Berosus

Also, her tomb was plundered in antiquity.


27 posted on 03/30/2006 10:28:52 PM PST by SunkenCiv (Yes indeed, Civ updated his profile and links pages again, on Monday, March 6, 2006.)
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To: wagglebee; nickcarraway; blam; FairOpinion; StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach
Parlour of Hatshepsut time unearthed
Friday, March 31, 2006
An Egyptian-Spanish archaeological expedition unearthed Thursday a parlour belonging to Gihoti, a workers' superintendent in charge of decorating temples and galleries during the reign of Queen Hatshepsut, 1502-1487 BC.

A game board was also excavated in a nearby room. Supreme Council of Antiquities Secretary General Zahi Hawwas said the parlour found in the Ancient Egyptian New Kingdom's capital of Thebes in Luxor Thursday was one of the largest as it is measured 34 metres long. The head of the Spanish team said that house utensils were also found.
New discovery in Luxor
Hassan Saadallah
Friday, March 31, 2006
AN Egyptian-Spanish archaeological team, operating on the West Bank in Luxor, have discovered a room housing the tomb of the foreman responsible for decorating all the temples and palaces in the ancient city of Thebes (modern-day Luxor) in the reign of Queen Hatshepsut (1502 - 1482 BC). The discovery, announced by Culture Minister Farouq Hosni, also includes a collection of wooden and clay artifacts.

According to Zahi Hawass, Secretary-General of the Supreme Council of Antiquities, this important discovery sheds light on the design of the buildings that housed tombs in the 18th Dynasty. "The building is 34 metres long and there are many drawings carved on the walls, as well as the words of sermons Ancient Egyptians listened to at the time," he explained, adding that the finds will displayed in the Luxor Museum.

28 posted on 03/31/2006 9:17:46 AM PST by SunkenCiv (Yes indeed, Civ updated his profile and links pages again, on Monday, March 6, 2006.)
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To: SunkenCiv
The true mummy of ancient Egyptian queen Hatshepsut was discovered in the third floor of the Egyptian Museum in Cairo, Secretary General of Supreme Council for Antiquities Zahi Hawwas revealed on Thursday.

How do you not realize (even in the Egyptian Museum) how many mummies you have?!

29 posted on 03/31/2006 9:22:51 AM PST by wagglebee ("We are ready for the greatest achievements in the history of freedom." -- President Bush, 1/20/05)
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To: wagglebee

Probably because a lot of it was brought in without a lot of documentation. :')

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/1603736/posts?page=25#25


30 posted on 03/31/2006 9:24:55 AM PST by SunkenCiv (Yes indeed, Civ updated his profile and links pages again, on Monday, March 6, 2006.)
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To: SunkenCiv

I guess that makes sense.


31 posted on 03/31/2006 9:26:54 AM PST by wagglebee ("We are ready for the greatest achievements in the history of freedom." -- President Bush, 1/20/05)
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To: wagglebee
The article doesn't say what evidence, if any, leads to the conclusion that they have found the real mummy of Hatshepsut.

This subject interests me because I once got into an argument with a relative about whether this mummy had been found. I had read a popular book on archaeology that had an illustration purporting to show the mummy of Hatshepsut.

It turned out that it was highly questionable that the mummy in the illustration was indeed Hatshepsut and I had to admit I was wrong.

Zahi Hawas is such a media hog, that the "discovery" of this mummy at the same time there is an Hatshepsut exhibition is cause for suspicion.

32 posted on 03/31/2006 4:39:08 PM PST by wideminded
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To: blam; FairOpinion; StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach

update, from the ArchaeoBlog:

http://archaeoblog.blogspot.com/

[snip]

Marianne Luban sent a post to the EEF lists regarding the possible reason why this new mummy is being touted as Hatchepsut, quoting part of an article in the Fall 2005 KMT magazine by Dennis Forbes on this mummy:

"It has recently been suggested to this writer that the elderly female [the one found lying on the floor of KV60 by Don Ryan] is, in fact, that of In-Sitre herself, and that the coffined mummy removed to the Egyptian Museum (and stored there today), very well may be Hatshepsut--this because the latter mummy purportedly has both arms folded across its chest (the so-called "king's pose"); and also because the advanced age and pendulous breasts of the uncoffined mummy are characteristics one would expect of a wet nurse."

The mummy sitting in KV-60 right now has only one arm crossed. That seems to be the only real evidence thus far.


33 posted on 04/16/2006 3:37:56 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: SunkenCiv

Maybe we should call for more expeditions to the storage rooms of museums....


34 posted on 04/16/2006 3:41:33 PM PDT by stands2reason
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To: Bernard Marx; monkeyman81; RandallFlagg; kalee; Larry Lucido; wagglebee; wideminded; Serb5150

whoops, should have pinged those who posted to this update:

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/1603736/posts?page=33#33


35 posted on 04/16/2006 3:42:20 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: stands2reason

:')


36 posted on 04/16/2006 3:42:55 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: wideminded
This subject interests me because I once got into an argument with a relative about whether this mummy had been found.

Wow, I wish I had relatives who cared about anything beyond their personal lives and what's on telly. Lucky you.

37 posted on 04/16/2006 3:47:35 PM PDT by stands2reason
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To: SunkenCiv

Guzendheit!


38 posted on 04/16/2006 3:48:07 PM PDT by ovrtaxt (Join the FR folding team!! http://vspx27.stanford.edu/cgi-bin/main.py?qtype=teampage&teamnum=36120)
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To: ovrtaxt

Thanks.


39 posted on 04/22/2006 12:59:26 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: SunkenCiv
Tooth clinches identification of Egyptian queen
40 posted on 06/27/2007 11:00:19 AM PDT by blam (Secure the border then, Introduce an Illegal Immigrant Deportation Bill)
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To: SunkenCiv

I find this so fascinating! I heard that Hatshepsut mummy found is going to be on the discovery channel. has anyone heard this? or know when its going to be on?


41 posted on 06/27/2007 1:03:59 PM PDT by thehadassah (the truth will set you free...)
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To: thehadassah; blam

There’s been a couple of newer topics about this as well, but this one is prettiest. ;’) Thanks!

Blam, thanks, great linked story!


42 posted on 06/27/2007 8:51:43 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (Time heals all wounds, particularly when they're not yours. Profile updated June 27, 2007.)
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Months after mummy claim, DNA science still lags [Hatshepsut]
ctv.ca | Thursday, December 20, 2007 | Associated Press
Posted on 12/23/2007 8:41:53 AM EST by SunkenCiv
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/1943476/posts


43 posted on 01/01/2008 11:15:56 AM PST by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/____________________Profile updated Sunday, December 30, 2007)
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Hatshepsut, KV60

44 posted on 01/01/2008 11:27:58 AM PST by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/____________________Profile updated Sunday, December 30, 2007)
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To: SunkenCiv

What a beautiful woman she must have been in life.


45 posted on 01/01/2008 11:33:04 AM PST by brwnsuga (Proud, Black, Conservative!!!)
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Gods
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Just updating the GGG info, not sending a general distribution.

To all -- please ping me to other topics which are appropriate for the GGG list.
GGG managers are SunkenCiv, StayAt HomeMother, and Ernest_at_the_Beach
 

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46 posted on 09/08/2008 10:29:36 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/_______Profile hasn't been updated since Friday, May 30, 2008)
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